Planned Outages

Planned Outages


Planned outages are necessary to conduct work that ensures our electrical system remains safe and reliable for our customers. These outages create safe work environments for our crews while they are working on our power system to do emergency repairs, system upgrades, maintenance, and other work on our electrical equipment.

There are three types of planned outages:

  1. Scheduled: This is an outage that we are aware of in advance, where crews will be scheduled to safely complete the work to improve reliability in the area. Example: A pole that needs to be replaced to ensure a reliable and efficient system.
  2. Urgent: This is an outage that needs to happen quickly to make necessary repairs safely, but it’s not an emergency. The outage can be identified and delayed until it’s less disruptive to customers. Example: Equipment with wear and tear that could fail if not replaced soon.
  3. Emergency: This is an outage that needs to happen right away to safely make emergency repairs, likely within the hour. Example: A broken pole caused by a vehicle accident.

We do everything we can to minimize the number of customers impacted by a planned outage. We also aim to inform customers of a planned outage 24–48 hours in advance with an automated phone message. To do this, it’s very important we have your up-to-date contact information to ensure you receive the planned outage notification.

If you have a new phone number, please call Customer Care at 1-800-428-6230 to update your account or fill out this online form.

Why We Plan Outages


We plan outages so we can safely conduct work to ensure our electrical system remains safe and reliable for our customers. A lot of the work we do on the power system can be done without a planned outage, but in some cases the only way to complete the work safely for our crews is with the power turned off. 

Planned outages are typically scheduled in advance so crews can work safely on our system. The work may include emergency repairs, system upgrades, maintenance, and other work on our electrical equipment.

A lot of the work we do to maintain and upgrade the power system can be done without a planned outage. However, in some cases, the only way to complete the work safely for our crews is by temporarily disconnecting power to a section of the powerline, which usually means an outage for some customers.

By doing this kind of planned work, our crews can help prevent a potential unplanned outage from occurring that can often be longer and more disruptive to our customers.

How we plan outages


We take a variety of factors into consideration when scheduling a date or time for planned outages. This includes safety of the public and our crews, weather conditions, availability of specialized crews and equipment, community events, and the impact to critical infrastructure and services. We try our best to find a time when it’s least disruptive to our customers.

Safety

Safety is our top priority. We need to ensure the work is done as safely as possible for our customers and crews.

Schools

If an outage may affect a school, we try to ensure the work is completed when school is out or closed.

Weather

Some work can’t be done safely in certain weather conditions. That’s why planned outages can sometimes be cancelled at the last minute.

Traffic Management

Some work may cause disruptions to traffic. We may need to work with municipal officials to coordinate the best course of action.

Crew Availability

Some work requires specialized crews and equipment. If this is the case, we must schedule work around their availability.

Community Events

If there is a community event or celebration scheduled, we'll try to find another day.

Upcoming Planned Outages


 

LOCATIONSTART DATE & TIMEEND DATE & TIMEAFFECTED AREA(S)REASON
Truro and Surrounding CommunitiesWednesday, June 19th - 8:00 PMWednesday, June 19th - 8:30 PM

Communities of Bible Hill/ Greenfield/ Murray Siding/ Salmon River/ Truro/ Valley/ and surrounding communitiesSee map for details.

30-minute switching procedure to the main service line feeding the greater Truro area.  Required to isolate a section of power line on Arthur Street in Truro that is undergoing extensive upgrade work.
Arthur Street, TruroWednesday, June 19th - 8:00 PMThursday, June 20th - 8:00 AM

Arthur Street/ Dominion Street/ King Street/ Pleasant Street/ Victoria Street

See map for details.

Extensive system upgrade work on Arthur Street to improve reliability.  This will require a 12-hour power interruption from Wednesday evening at 8:00PM to Thursday morning at 8:00 AM.
Fairview, HalifaxFriday, June 14th - 1:00 AMFriday, June 14th - 4:00 AM

Dutch Village Road/ Bayers Road/ Joseph Howe Drive/ Sunnybrae Avenue/ Adelaide Avenue/ Fredrick Avenue/ Rosedale Avenue/ Washmill Lake Drive/ and connecting side streets.

See map for details.

Replacing broken mainline power pole near the intersection of Dutch Village Road and Sunnybrae Avenue.
New Campbellton AreaWednesday, June 12th - 9:00 AMWednesday, June 12th - 1:00 PM

New Campbellton Road/ New Harris Road/ Big Harbour Road/ Stewart Road/ and connecting side roads.

See map for details.

Replacing damaged power poles.
Albert Bridge substationSunday, June 9th - 5:00 AMSunday, June 9th - 5:10 AM

Albert Bridge/ Homeville/ Mira Gut/ Main-A- Dieu/ Bateston/ Louisbourg/ Marion Bridge/ Gabarus/ Victoria Bridge/ and neighbouring communities

See map for details.

Maintenance work at the Albert Bridge substation to help improve system reliability.
Pubnico and surrounding communitiesSunday, June 9th - 5:00 AMSunday, June 9th - 9:00 AM

Pubnico/ West Pubnico/ Lower East Pubnico/ Charlesville/ Lower Woods Harbour/ and neighbouring communities

See map for details.

Replacing damaged piece of equipment at the Lower East Pubnico substation.
Clayton ParkWednesday, June 5th - 8 AMWednesday, June 5th - 4:00 PM

Hillwood Crescent/ Glenforest Drive/ Willowbend Court/ Tangmere Crescent/ Southill Drive

See map for details.

Tree trimming work.
Cabot Trail, Middle RiverSunday, June 2nd - 6:00 AMSunday, June 2nd - 8:00 AM

Section of the Cabot Trail from North East Margaree to Lower Middle River

See map for details.

Replacing damaged mainline pole on the Cabot Trail in Middle River.
Richmond CountySunday, May 26th - 4:00 AMSunday, May 26th - 6:00 AM

Communities of West Bay/ West Bay Road/ Queensville/ Crandall Road/ Cleveland/ Port Hawkesbury/ Port Malcolm/ Louisdale/ Isle Madam/ and neighbouring communities.

See map for details.

Additional upgrades to the transmission switch at the Cleveland substation to improve network reliability.

 

Frequently Asked Questions


What’s the difference between a planned outage and emergency outage?

Most planned outages are scheduled well in advance. Crews will be scheduled to do the work on a specific day and time. This type of planned outage is necessary to safely improve reliability in the area. An example would be a pole that needs to be replaced to prevent an unplanned outage from occurring in the future

Some outages are required to make emergency repairs. This type of outage needs to happen right away, likely within the hour, for the safety of crews, customers and the electrical system. An example would be a broken pole cause by a vehicle accident.

Why do we schedule planned outages?

To ensure our electrical system remains safe and reliable for our customers, it requires regular maintenance, and planned outages are typically scheduled in advance so we can work safely on our system. The work may include emergency repairs, system upgrades, maintenance and other work on our electrical equipment.

To do this work safely, we must temporarily disconnect power to a section of the powerline, which usually means an outage for some customers.

By doing this kind of planned work, our crews can help prevent a potential unplanned outage that can often be longer and more disruptive to our customers.

When do we do planned outages?

We take a variety of factors into consideration when scheduling a date or time for planned outages. This includes safety of the public and our crews, weather conditions, availability of specialized crews and equipment, community events, and the impact to critical infrastructure and services. We try our best to find a time when it’s less disruptive for our customers.

How do we notify customers of planned outages?

We aim to inform customers of a planned outage 24 to 48 hours in advance—in some cases, a week in advance—with an automated phone message. To do this, it’s very important we have your up-to-date contact information to ensure you receive the planned outage notification. If you have a new phone number, please call Customer Care at 1-800-428-6230 to update your account or fill out this online form.

We also list impactful planned outages (long outages or those in busy areas) on our website and sometimes post them on our Twitter channel, if necessary, based on outage size and duration.

If an emergency repair is needed immediately, we may not be able to provide notice. Once the outage begins, it will appear on the outage map with the reason for the interruption and the estimated time of restoration.

Why can’t you plan outages at night or on weekends?

Most of the work must be done during daylight hours to keep our customers and crews safe. By doing this kind of planned work, our crews can help prevent a potential unplanned outage that can often be longer and more disruptive to our customers.

Why do you cancel planned outages?

We work to keep the scheduled date of a planned outage in place, but cancellations can occur due to adverse weather conditions or crew constraints if emergencies occur.


More about how we maintain our system