Latest Restoration Updates


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4


As crews continue to focus on restoring power to customers in the two regions of the province hardest hit by Fiona, some estimated restoration times have been moved out.

In Cape Breton, some of the remaining customers have seen their estimated times change to Thursday and Friday, while customers in the northeast region including Antigonish, Pictou, Colchester, and Cumberland have seen their estimated times move into the weekend. 

Those customers who are now seeing restoration times moved to Sunday will be receiving a call directly from Customer Care to talk about the situation.

The majority of the remaining outages in the province are what we call ‘single outages’, which means each impact one customer.  These restorations will take at least one crew to restore power for one customer, although in many cases it takes several crews and several hours to get restored. 

The remaining repairs are also more complex, with crews needing to rebuild entire sections of lines and poles.  Areas still need to be cleared from debris and trees, broken poles, transformers and fuses need to be replaced and crews are installing new service lines to homes.   

There are also more than 2300 broken meter masts.  This damage requires the homeowner to have a certified electrician make repairs before NS Power can safely restore power.  We have a team in Customer Care dedicated to working directly with these customers and supporting them through the repair process.

The United Way in Halifax, Northeastern Nova Scotia and Cape Breton have launched a United Hurricane Relief Fund to provide immediate relief funding to help community agencies support those impacted by Fiona.  The Government of Nova Scotia is also offering disaster assistance to help with damage caused by the storm.

               

NORTHEAST

  • Over 900 people are on the ground in the northeast region including power line technicians, forestry technicians, damage assessors and field support.
  • As power is restored in one area, we continue to move crews into this hardest hit area of the province.
  • All hospitals and critical infrastructure have been restored. Our crews continue to focus on areas with extensive damage including the Eastern Shore, Truro, Pictou County, Antigonish, Amherst, North Shore.
  • Our satellite Emergency Operations Centre in Truro continues to coordinate plans/resources for the northeast region of the province.
  • Together with the Canadian Armed Forces, the staging site in Pictou County is supporting restoration efforts.  This is where we coordinate and dispatch crews – a one stop shop for materials, fuel and food.
  • The Canadian Armed Forces and Department of Natural Resources personnel are in the region helping crews remove trees and brush and running supplies.
  • Damage in this region is due primarily to broken poles and downed lines due to falling trees, trees on power lines, and trees on roads limiting access and making travel difficult for our crews.
  • About 90,000 customers have been affected in this region.  As of today (Tuesday), approximately 88% of customers in the northeast who lost power from the impacts of the hurricane have been restored.

       

       

Pictou County1

       

       

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CAPE BRETON

  • Over 500 people are on the ground in Cape Breton, including powerline technicians, forestry technicians, damage assessors and field support.
  • All industrial parks and major centres in Cape Breton Regional Municipality (CBRM) now have power. 
  • There are parts of neighborhoods as well as individual customers throughout CBRM that are still out due to extensive damage. We have crews going street to street to assess and restore power in these areas.
  • Our satellite Emergency Operations Centre in Cape Breton continues to coordinate plans/resources for CB.
  • The staging site in Sydney supports our restoration efforts.  This is where we coordinate and dispatch crews – a one stop shop for materials, fuel and food.
  • The Canadian Armed Forces and Department of Natural Resources personnel are on the ground in Cape Breton helping crews remove trees and brush and running supplies.
  • Damage in Cape Breton is due primarily to hundreds of broken poles and downed lines due to falling trees, trees on power lines. Washed out roads have limited access and made it difficult for our crews to move around.
  • More than 65,000 customers have been affected in this region.  As of today (Tuesday), approximately 96% of customers in Cape Breton who lost power from the impacts of the hurricane have been restored. 

 

       

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Downtown Halifax

       

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Downtown Halifax

Halifax Regional Municipality

  • Damage in HRM has been due primarily to trees coming into contact with power lines, downed lines due to falling trees and trees on roads limiting and making travel difficult for our crews.
  • More than 210,000 customers have been affected in this region.  As of today (Tuesday) there are less than 100 customers to be restored. 
  • These are more complex restorations that take much longer and require multiple crews.
Hurricane Fiona Recovery Sept 26 NC1_7284

 


 

HURRICANE FIONA SUPPORT


PROVINCIAL FINANCIAL SUPPORT

  • $100 for every household that lost power for at least 48 hours to cover the cost of spoiled food
  • $250 for every person that must pay for tree or debris removal from their property
  • An additional $250 on top of the existing $750 seniors care grant to help with storm repairs
  • $150 to all current income assistance recipients, including Disability Support Program participants receiving income support
  • Will cover up to $200,000 per household for non-insured losses. There is no deductible.

HOW TO APPLY FOR DISASTER ASSISTANCE


 

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS


Estimated Times of Restoration

What is an estimated time of restoration?

An estimated time of restoration (or ETR) is our best estimate of when power will be restored. 

Why is my restoration time pushed back?

We do our best to predict when the power will be restored during an outage, but estimated restorations times sometimes change once crews get on site and assess the damage.

Initial estimated restoration times on our outage map are based on a number of factors—weather conditions, location of the outage, suspected severity of damage, past outages in your area, and more.

Once we’re able to assess the damage and identify anything else that may impact restorations (ex: unsafe situation, blocked road), we’ll update the estimated restoration time.

How do you come up with an estimated time of restoration?

The initial estimate is based on weather conditions, road and travel conditions, location of the outage and previous storm and outage historical information. As we assess damage, estimated restoration times will sometimes change based on the severity of the damage.

Why is my neighbour’s estimated restoration time shorter than mine?

If your neighbour has a different restoration time than you, it’s possible that their power is supplied by a different powerline and/or a different substation or that one of you has damage requiring additional time to repair. 

Why is it taking so long to get my power back?

We know how tough it is to go days without power. One key challenge with Hurricane Fiona has been accessing the hardest hit areas. This is a huge undertaking.

Together with the Canadian Armed Forces, Department of Natural Resources and other support personnel, roads are being cleared and access to hard-to-reach areas. This allows our crews to get in, ensure the area is safe, prepped and ready to start repairing and rebuilding power lines and poles.

More than 1400 people are in the field and hundreds more behind the scenes, helping to restore your power - and more are on the way.

Why does my estimated restoration time sometimes change on the outage map?

We do our best to predict when the power will be restored during an outage, but estimated restorations times sometimes change once crews get on site and assess the damage.

Initial estimated restoration times on our outage map are based on a number of factors – weather conditions, location of the outage, suspected severity of damage, past outages in your area, and more. Once we’re able to assess the damage and identify anything else that may impact restorations (ex: unsafe situation, unplowed road), we’ll update the estimated restoration time.


My neighbours have power, why don’t I?

There could be localized damage impacting only your area.

Our crews will get your power back on. They have to focus first on repairs that will restore power to critical services like hospitals, police, fire, water and communications. Then, they make repairs that restore the largest number of customers in the least amount of time.

Please ensure your outage has been reported via outagemap.nspower.ca or call us to ensure we know you are still without power at 1-877-428-6004.

Why is my estimated restoration time so long when there is no damage on my street?

Damage does not have to be on your street to cause a power outage.  Your power originates at a substation and, depending on where you live, that substation can be kilometers away.

If damage occurs anywhere between the substation and your residence, it can cause an outage.

Outage Map

My outage isn’t showing on the map. What do I do?

With an event this large, the outage map sometimes starts grouping events together, which sometimes causes your outage to not appear on your map. If you select “Report an outage” and enter your account info, you’ll get outage info specific to your address. 

I’ve reported my outage. Why isn’t it on the map?

With an event this large, the outage map sometimes starts grouping events together, which sometimes causes your outage to not appear on your map.

If you select “Report an outage” and enter your account info, you’ll get outage info specific to your address.

Please know that if you’ve reported your outage, we’re aware of it and our crews will do everything they can to safely restore your power as soon as possible.

Why is the start time on the outage map incorrect?

We do our best to ensure the outage map is as accurate as possible, but a few things could impact the start time listed for your outage. It could be caused by a “nested outage”.

This means that your neighbourhood might be experiencing one outage, but the outage your home is experiencing is caused by a more localized issue—like a blown fuse or a tree hanging on your home’s direct power line.

Why does my estimated restoration time sometimes change on the outage map?

We do our best to predict when the power will be restored during an outage, but estimated restorations times sometimes change once crews get on site and assess the damage.

Initial estimated restoration times on our outage map are based on a number of factors – weather conditions, location of the outage, suspected severity of damage, past outages in your area, and more. Once we’re able to assess the damage and identify anything else that may impact restorations (ex: unsafe situation, unplowed road), we’ll update the estimated restoration time.


Financial Support

What supports are available to me?

The government of Nova Scotia has announced disaster assistance for damages related to Hurricane Fiona. $100 for every household that lost power for at least 48 hours to cover the cost of spoiled food, and $250 for every person that must pay for tree or debris removal from their property.

An additional $250 on top of the existing $750 seniors care grant to help with storm repairs. $150 to all current income assistance recipients, including Disability Support Program participants receiving income support, will cover up to $200,000 per household for non-insured losses. There is no deductible.


Helpful information


To help ensure your power is restored as quickly as possible during a storm, you should check for damage to your electrical equipment. 

Have a look at your meter mast. It’s the tube that connects the service line to your home. Has the meter mast pulled away from your house? Is it bent or broken? If so, you’ll need a certified electrician to make repairs. We're here to help get you reconnected safely and quickly. For more information and to contact an electrician, visit our Repair a Damaged Meter page.

 


SAFETY REMINDERS FROM OUR CREWS


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For your safety and the safety of our crews, please remember these crucial safety measures:

1. Do not attempt to handle downed powerlines—they should be treated as live or energized.

2. Be aware of trees touching or tangled up in overhead lines—don’t attempt to cut them down yourself.

3. Keep a safe distance from crews working on the scene—don’t walk through or near by because it can be dangerous.

4. Stay off the road unless necessary—traffic could create more hazards to our crews and delay restoration efforts.

2 electrical engineers working on the lines

Downed Line & Fallen Trees

For safety, consider all cables and wires to be energized whether they are electrical, cable or telephone and stay a school bus distance away. If a line is in the water, there is even more reason to be cautious and consider it and the water energized. Keep children away from all flooded areas and areas with lots of debris because the water or storm debris could be hiding an energized line. You shouldn’t try to remove or trim branches near a power line. If a tree or tree limbs have fallen on a power line or pulled it down, keep a safe distance from the line or the tree. Contact us as soon as you can at 1-877-428-6004.

Generator Safety

Generators that aren’t installed correctly put you, your family, your property and our line crews at risk. Never install a generator indoors. If you plan to connect your generator directly to your electrical system, a qualified electrician must install it. The electrician must apply for a wiring permit and have the generator inspected by a Nova Scotia Power wiring inspector before it is used. Never feed power from your generator into a wall outlet or directly into your electrical system. This could allow power to back-feed into our system and result in severe injury or death to our employees. When power is restored after and outage, it may feed directly into your generator, causing severe damage. To eliminate this dangerous situation, a transfer switch is required to be properly installed by a qualified electrician.
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Water and Electricity Do Not Mix

Don't attempt to access your electrical panel if there is water in the immediate area. Customers should take every precaution and never come into contact with the water or the panel until power has been disconnected. Customers should contact our Customer Care Centre at 1-877-428-6004 and request an emergency disconnect of power. Before service can be restored, a certified electrician will need to facilitate the necessary repairs and inspection.