TODAY'S POWER


Delivering clean, affordable energy for Nova Scotians is our mission and commitment. We believe in building a greener future for our province, and that’s why we’ve made our transition to renewable energy a priority.

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  • TODAY'S POWER

0% of Nova Scotia’s electricity is generated from renewable sources

Where is Your Energy Coming From?

There’s a lot of work that goes into powering our communities each day! It’s our job to make sure that electricity is always there when you need it, and that means making sure we’re generating the right amount of power to match demand throughout the day. The weather plays an important role in deciding where your electricity comes from. On a blustery day, as much as 50% of your electricity could be generated by wind.
Wind
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HYDRO & TIDAL
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Natural Gas & Oil
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Biomass
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Solid Fuel
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Imports
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30 Days of Wind Generation


Wind power is the largest contributor to renewable energy in our province—but because it’s an intermittent source of energy, we can’t always count on it. Today we generate electricity from wind in real-time when the weather conditions are right. In the future, technology like battery storage will allow us to store excess generation from wind, enabling us to bring more of this important renewable energy resource to the grid.
Maximum available wind ( MW)
30 Day Low MW
30 Day High MW
Updated Daily

Peak Power | April 19, 2021


Electric load management is how we match our electricity supply with customer demand. Each day we anticipate the peak load so that we can ensure we’re generating enough electricity to serve you.

Current Load
available capacity

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Forecasted Peak Load

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Yesterday's Peak Load

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Disclaimer:

Nova Scotia Power Inc. does not make any representation or warranty, express or implied, as to the accuracy or completeness of this information. None of the forward looking information provided should be taken as definitive forecasts, nor should they be taken as implying any indication, assurance or guarantee that those assumptions are correct or exhaustive.

0 tonnes of CO2 emissions reduced since 2010

WHERE WE MAKE ELECTRICITY IN NOVA SCOTIA

We make electricity from a variety of sources. You can find our facilities from wind farms, to hydroelectric plants, to thermal generating stations across Nova Scotia.

MAKING A CLEANER MEGAWATT | Transition to Renewables


We’ve come a long way in our renewable energy journey. We’re proud to be a North American leader in reducing carbon emissions, tripling our renewable energy over the past decade—and we won’t stop there. We’re on our way to a future that is cleaner, reliable and affordable for all Nova Scotians.
  • 2004 9% 45,000 homes
    Hydroelectricity provides most of Nova Scotia's renewable energy. Tidal energy contributes a small portion.
  • 2008 12% 60,000 homes
    The first wind farms start to become an important part of our generation mix, including Lingan Wind Farm and Pubnico Wind Farm.
  • 2011 19% 95,000 homes
    More wind farms come online, notably Nuttby Mountain Wind Farm and Digby Neck Wind Farm.
  • 2014 22% 110,000 homes
    Renewable energy from COMFIT projects and the Port Hawkesbury Biomass plant help move us over the 20% renewable mark.
  • 2015 27% 135,000 homes
    COMFITs continue to come online, and renewable energy coming from Sable Wind Farm and South Canoe Wind Farm helped us surpass our requirement of 25% renewable by the end of 2015.
  • 2021 40% 200,000 homes
    Nova Scotia Power will generate 40% of its electricity from renewable sources. Hydroelectricity from Maritime Link and Muskrat Falls will be key projects involved in helping us to reach this target.

Maritime Link


The Maritime Link will deliver clean, renewable and reliable electricity from Newfoundland and Labrador to Nova Scotia and reduce the use of fossil fuels and exposure to unpredictable oil and solid fuel prices.
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Disclaimer:

Nova Scotia Power Inc. does not make any representation or warranty, express or implied, as to the accuracy or completeness of this information. None of the forward looking information provided should be taken as definitive forecasts, nor should they be taken as implying any indication, assurance or guarantee that those assumptions are correct or exhaustive.